Wednesday, November 03, 2010

After Fire, A Little Yellow Aluminum-Clad House Goes From Eyesore To More Contextual

178 Smith Street back in February 2009
After a fire in November 2009...
And Now
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This little yellow house at 178 Smith Street went through an incredible transformation since a fire destroyed the building back in November 2009.  Never a beauty, what with its yellow aluminum siding, it has  been totally rebuilt in the last few months.   In the process, it has gained just a bit of height so that it now is in line with its neighbors on the left.  Thankfully, it has also lost its cladding, but gained a brick fa├žade and a new cornice.  The result is much, much better than the original structure, which was a real eyesore.  Most importantly, it is more contextual.
It's only a pity that the building has been "fedderized." It's also too bad that it did not get some window detail like lintels.  Otherwise, I think it would have been (almost) perfect.
What do you think, dear Reader?

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10 comments:

Anonymous said...

...or chick peas.

Black beans are nice too...

:)

gary said...

Vast improvement!

Mmm, lintel soup . . .

Katia said...

Oops! Thanks for the spell check, guys.

Anonymous said...

Nice!

The insurance money was key I think...

Anonymous said...

From the way that siding melted I imagine it was vinyl rather than aluminum... made from PVC that releases very toxic dioxins when burned.

Anonymous said...

That's LENTIL soup. A LINTIL is defined as a horizontal block that spans the space between two supports in classical western architecture.[1] In classical western construction methods, defining lintel by its Merriam-Webster definition, a lintel is a load-bearing member and is placed over an entranceway.[2] Thus in ancient classical architecture, the lintel often rested on pillars made of piled stones such as in the building of the Treasury of Atreus in Mycenae, Greece. In architecture around the world however, a lintel is not considered (as it is in the very narrow view of classical architecture) as purely an element of the Post and lintel.

Anonymous said...

That house was really quite nice. There were 2 beautiful old dogwood trees in the yard above the subway that were so nice when in bloom.. I was sad when that "Eco" friendly building with all those solar panels and huffy employees ripped them out to build. That house was actually what most of the nighborhood looked like back in the day. I say the fire was set deliberately to get the people out. I hate Smith Street...

Anonymous said...

anon 7:03 sounds like one of the conspiracy theorist nutjobs.
Cause of fire was determined to be from the shoe repair.
You don't need to set fire to get rid of people. And for commercial tenants still have lease.
Shame on you for your cynicism

Anonymous said...

Dude. Where's your sense of humor? I live here also and know alll about the fire. :)

Dave 'Paco' Abraham said...

any idea what's going in there now? is the shoe repair man and the barber shop coming back? It certainly is nice to see see the building fit the context a bit better. Thanks for the report Katia.