Monday, November 28, 2011

After Eleanor, A Sheepdog, Is Attack By Another In Carroll Gardens, Her Owner Has Some Advice

While on a walk on President Street last week, Eleanor, the sweet dog in the photos above, was attacked by another dog and needed surgery.  Thankfully she is slowly recuperating,  The outcome could have been much different, however.  The other dog, a pit bull,had apparently shown aggression towards other dogs before.
Eleanor's owner Elizabeth contacted me late last week to make me aware of the incident and to give sound advice others.  She writes:
Earlier this week my gentle and docile Old English Sheepdog, Eleanor, was attacked and bitten by an aggressive dog on the sidewalk and had to receive surgery--she was lucky to come away alive. The owner of the other dog told me that it was not the first time her dog had attacked another dog and that she was aware her dog was aggressive.Since speaking with other people in the neighborhood and the local vets, I've heard of several incidents of unprovoked attacks by aggressive dogs (frequently pitbulls, as was the case in this situation).It is imperative that these incidents be reported via 311 before a child, older person, or another dog is attacked. If a human is bitten it is mandatory to report the incident within 24 hours via 311. If a dog is bitten, the police can be alerted by reporting an unrestrained or off-leash dog (this can be done online or via 311) and then an investigation will take place. Additionally, if there is an attack, or if you see a vicious dog, call 911 immediately and wait for the police to arrive--it is best not to wait until later to call so thatthey can take a report.I understand that people who own dogs that occasionally become aggressive, including pitbulls, do their best and are often taking in dogs that have been abandoned. However, those owners need to muzzle their dogs if they are aware of any problems, particularly if they are walking them when children are on theirway to school.Thank you to all the kind people in the neighborhood who helped care for Eleanor in the immediate aftermath of the attack--she has appreciated all the attention and seems to feel a bit like a rock star because of it, and is well on her way to recovering.
Lets hope that Eleanor will recover soon. It is indeed important that we make sure that owners of aggressive dogs take appropriate steps to restrain them before they cause injury to others. Thanks for making us aware, Elizabeth.


8 comments:

Anonymous said...

If you have a dog that has bitten other dogs before, or that is even the slightest bit aggressive, shouldn't it be muzzled when going outside? As an owner of such a dog, you would be doing the dog a favor. Because if your dog bites me, or a dog I love, I will do my best to do all I can to make sure your dog does not do that EVER again! I will also see if there is any legal recourse I can take against you. There are so many, too many, stories out there about dogs that bite, and even worse.

Anonymous said...

Also- Parents- please keep an eye on your child when walking. Dog owners really don't like it when they run up to their dogs and pet them or get in their face. Friendly or not- dog owners don't want to deal with the results.

Anonymous said...

I think Elizabeth is very kind to share this information. I hope Eleanor feels better soon. She looks like a real sweetie.

Anonymous said...

I have a small dog and was warned by a neighbor about a similar incident that took place on Smith Street. A pit bull apparently got away from its owner and ran across the street to attack a smaller dog. I know not all pit bulls are mean, but I'm definitely keeping an eye out, better safe than sorry!

Anonymous said...

I don't know why anyone would want a pit bull - 95% of the scary stories you hear involve pit bulls. I know they can be sweet. But I am afraid of them when I see one coming down the street. I have seen a man who strides down Nevins with his pit bull OFF leash - am I goin to say anything? Noooo....

Anonymous said...

The proper action in dog-walking etiquette is to cross the street if you see an approaching dog that might be a potential threat, especially if you're walking a small dog. Likewise, a person walking a large dog is practicing a common courtesy by crossing the street to avoid a potential confrontation with an approaching smaller dog. I've seen numerous dogs in our neighborhood wearing muzzles, and their owners, cognizant of their dogs' demeanors, are acting responsibly to prevent possible problems.

Anonymous said...

My dog was lunged at tonight by a vicious dog who lives at [ ] Kane Street. I pulled my dog away before teeth met skin but it was a close call. Their dog was more than twice as big as mine and was going directly for my dog's neck when all my pup was trying to do was do her business! The owners were completely unapologetic (saying OH, that's just what dogs do, lady) and when I told them their dog needed to be muzzled they basically told me to go home. Well, that's putting it nicely. 311 was of no help, so I've reported it to the local police precinct so they have a record of it (the police told me they would stop by the Kane Street pet owners' home but I have my doubts) but I found it disturbing that 311 did not have a specific agency to deal with this sort of problem. They kept asking me if a HUMAN had been bitten... but if a dog wants to attack another dog, isn't that dangerous as well?
We'll see what comes of the police report, I will definitely be following up. The last time my dog was attacked- by a pit bull on Court Street about 3 weeks ago- I was in too much shock to do anything- besides blubber and cry, I was totally useless!- but this time I forced myself to be assertive and get to the bottom of things!

Anonymous said...

My puppy was attacked by a Wheaten Terrier while they were sniffing each other on a walk. The dog lunged at my dog and bit her eye. Thankfully, my dog closed her eye when the other dog made contact, but it was swollen shut and bruised. Had she not closed it, the dog would have taken out her eye.

Since it was a morning walk, my husband didn't have his cell phone to take the other owner's information down. The guy gave his name and phone number to my husband, who hastily wrote it down in a rush to get my dog home and to the vet. The other owner told my husband that he would take care of any medical bills we incurred and that he walks his dog around the area all the time. For one month straight, my husband waited every morning for an hour for the guy to come back so they could hash out the medical bills, and the guy never showed.

DOG OWNERS BEWARE!